The Extension

Frank Gehry – A Review in Architecture – 8 Spruce Street

Posted in Architecture, Design, NYC by ologundudu on February 22, 2011

So once again, I’m turning to a topic of great interest to me. Architecture. I cannot stress enough how much I like this form of design, and its impact in a larger sense on the people and places affected by buildings.

One of Gehry’s most famous well known works is the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, Spain. A beautiful and strange structure no doubt, one that makes me think of ocean waves, clouds, and anti symmetrical designs. Below are a few photos…

For his latest work Gehry won the competition back in 2003 to design a new high rise for lower Manhattan’s (below 14th street) skyline. At 76 stories high, it is currently the tallest residential building in New York City history. Made of a stainless steel panel exterior, the buildings facade changes constantly depending on your vantage point. Areas of the metal jut out, while others curve inward creating a seemingly multi-dimensional surface. We perhaps could argue, yet another building built for the rich? Young people with trust funds, and royalties, another generation of young adults that are over-indulged, and not nearly compassionate enough for the common man. But to move away from all this, the awe and beauty of this very tall structure cannot be discounted. I would say that Gehry, in his way, has served New York well. Another awesome building, that signifies some of that changes of our generation…”A Downtown Skyscraper for the Digital Age.” -via The New York Times

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